What is Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and How it works

0
868
What is SSL and How it works

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a standard security technology for establishing an encrypted link between a server and a client—typically a web server (website) and a browser, or a mail server and a mail client (e.g., Outlook).

SSL allows sensitive information such as credit card numbers, social security numbers, and login credentials to be transmitted securely. Normally, data sent between browsers and web servers is sent in plain text—leaving you vulnerable to eavesdropping. If an attacker is able to intercept all data being sent between a browser and a web server, they can see and use that information.

More specifically, SSL is a security protocol. Protocols describe how algorithms should be used. In this case, the SSL protocol determines variables of the encryption for both the link and the data being transmitted.

All browsers have the capability to interact with secured web servers using the SSL protocol. However, the browser and the server need what is called an SSL Certificate to be able to establish a secure connection.

SSL secures millions of peoples’ data on the Internet every day, especially during online transactions or when transmitting confidential information. Internet users have come to associate their online security with the lock icon that comes with an SSL-secured website or green address bar that comes with an Extended Validation SSL-secured website. SSL-secured websites also begin with https rather than http

How SSL Certificates Work

  1. A browser or server attempts to connect to a Website, a.k.a. Web server, secured with SSL. The browser/server requests that the Web server identify itself.
  2. The Web server sends the browser/server a copy of its SSL certificate.
  3. The browser/server checks to see whether or not it trusts the SSL certificate. If so, it sends a message to the Web server.
  4. The Web server sends back a digitally signed acknowledgement to start an SSL encrypted session.
  5. Encrypted data is shared between the browser/server and the Web server.

How SSL works

There are many benefits to using SSL Certificates. Namely, SSL customers:

  • Get HTTPs which elicits a stronger Google ranking
  • Create safer experiences for your customers
  • Build customer trust and improve conversions
  • Protect both customer and internal data
  • Encrypt browser-to-server and server-to-server communication
  • Increase security of your mobile and cloud apps

READ MORE:  About SSL

History

SSL is a protocol with a long history and several versions. First prototypes came from Netscape, when they were developing the first versions of their flagship browser, Netscape Navigator (this browser killed off Mosaic in the early times of the Browser Wars, which are still raging, albeit with new competitors). Version 1 has never been made public so we do not know how it looked like. SSL version 2 is described in a draft which can be read there; it has a number of weaknesses, some of them rather serious, so it is deprecated and newer SSL/TLS implementations do not support it (while older deactivated by default). I will not speak of SSL version 2 any further, except as an occasional reference.

SSL version 3 (which I will call “SSLv3”) was an enhanced protocol which still works today and is widely supported. Although still a property of Netscape Communications (or whoever owns that nowadays), the protocol has been published as an “historical RFC” (RFC 6101). Meanwhile, the protocol has been standardized, with a new name in order to avoid legal issues; the new name is TLS.

Three versions of TLS have been produced to far, each with its dedicated RFC: TLS 1.0, TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2. They are internally very similar with each other, and with SSLv3, to the point that an implementation can easily support SSLv3 and all three TLS versions with at least 95% of the code being common. Still internally, all versions are designated by a version number with the major.minor format; SSLv3 is then 3.0, while the TLS versions are, respectively, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3. Thus, it is no wonder that TLS 1.0 is sometimes called SSL 3.1 (and it is not incorrect either). SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 differ by only some minute details. TLS 1.1 and 1.2 are not yet widely supported, although there is impetus for that, because of possible weaknesses (see below, for the “BEAST attack”). SSLv3 and TLS 1.0 are supported “everywhere” (even IE 6.0 knows them).

NO COMMENTS